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My first post this month was a long overdue answer to a tweet I hadn't known how to answer: Where is the Line Between Being Critical & Contrarian? Thoughts On a Plague.

Sputnik V has now been hit by wartime sanctions. I dug through the propaganda and evidence: Did We Ever Find Out How Effective Sputnik V Actually Is?

And when I realized I knew nothing about the history of women scientists in Ukraine, I went down a mind-blowing rabbit hole. It was hard to pick, but I whittled it down to 15 amazing women born before WWII. The Early Women Scientists of Ukraine series:

 

Observing the 1914 solar eclipse in Ukraine (via Wikimedia)

 

 

From the last few months of 2021, some posts on science culture and practice:

I was an invited participant for a discussion at Metascience 2021, but had to pull out (the reason why, is at the end of this post. Simine Vizire graciously read some comments from me for the session, and I wrote up a blog post based on that:

That kicked off a flurry of social media comment, leading to another session on one of the examples I'd raised – open science badges – at the 2021 AIMOS conference. This time I did show up. The video of that 1-hour panel with Brian Nosek, Anisa Rowhani-Farid, and me, moderated by Steve Kambouris, is on YouTube.

And posts on Covid vaccines:

Finally, for those who follow this website, but not my Twitter account, and are wondering about why there's been such a downturn in posting. My life crumpled in September 2021, when I was shattered by the death of my son, Adam. I'm grateful for all the kindness sent my way in these dreadful months. With a heartfelt hug to everyone going through this, or other, intense grief.

 

Was the FDA too slow or too fast in deciding on full approval for the first Covid vaccine? My thoughts at The Atlantic: The FDA Really Did Have to Take This Long.

Meanwhile, Peter Doshi continued his criticisms of Covid vaccines at BMJ Blogs, again arguing that no Covid vaccine should be fully approved until well into 2022 at the earliest. This time, he added another argument, and I tackled it at Absolutely Maybe: This "Waning Immunity" Argument Against the FDA's Covid Vaccine Approval is a Scientific Quagmire.

Also at Absolutely Maybe, a trio of posts on outstanding breakthroughs by 16 women in the first century of vaccine science – from discovering where in the body antibodies are made, identifying and naming the natural killer cells, and including a Nobel-prize-winning achievement: 1900-1930s (Part 1), 1940s-1960s (Part 2), and 1970s-1990s (Part 3).

 

 

 

 

In which I push back at the arguments people are making for not vaccinating adolescents and children against Covid-19: A Worrying Drift Towards Exceptionalism in the Covid Vax For Kids Debate.

A study too unusual and important for just a tweet. At Absolutely Maybe, A Communication Research Unicorn! Decent Evidence You Can Change People's Minds & Actions Via Social Media.

 

 

 

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